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Construction noise a welcome surprise for family getting needed bathroom overhaul

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RAYTOWN, Mo. -- The constant refrain of scraping and sawing and hammering from the men remodeling Kristal Wilson's bathroom can bring her to tears.

Not of sadness, but of joy.

"Just the process of it and the fact that it is happening," Wilson said. "Any time I think about it, my eyes water."

She becomes emotional because the changes underway in the Wilson family bathroom will make life a whole lot easier.

Kristal and Nick Wilson's only child Brett has spinal muscular atrophy and will always be in a wheelchair. The Wilson's Raytown home, like most homes, wasn't built for a wheelchair. Brett's wheelchair barely makes it through his bedroom door and can't make it through the bathroom door at all.

"He has to be lifted manually to ever go in there for any reason," Kristal said.

At more than 80 pounds, 15-year-old Brett would prefer not to have to ask his parents for help, but he has no choice.

"I can deal with it, but it's frustrating," Brett said.

The Wilsons had been hoping to remodel the bathroom, but the regular daily expenses of raising a special needs child kept eating up their budget. They never even considered asking anyone for help, so they were shocked to get a phone call from Jake Schloegel, owner of Schloegel Design Remodel in Kansas City.

The Wilsons, who had been secretly nominated by a family friend, were the winners of the Schloegel's Big Splash Custom Bathroom Giveaway. Their's is the fifth bathroom to be transformed in the four years since the Big Splash began.

Choosing a family can be difficult for the team at Schloegel, which gets help finding deserving families from the FOX 4 Love Fund.

"We get a lot of nominations every year," Jake Schloegel said. "It's hard to put our finger on it because there are so many deserving people, but there is something about it when we meet a young man like Brett who is doing all he can do, and is doing a good job."

The changes will be huge. When FOX 4 Problem Solvers visited, the bathroom had already been gutted and enlarged.

"Next we're putting in a new window," Schloegel said. "Plus we tore out the tub and will put a curbless roll-in shower for Brett."

Brett said what he's most looking forward to is being able to roll up to the sink in his wheelchair and wash his hands, a task most people don't think twice about it, but something Brett has never been able to do on his own.

Plus the door frame to Brett's bedroom has been enlarged. The new door will be electronic, so Brett can close it by himself, giving him the privacy every teenager desires.

"I've been talking about it a lot," Brett said. "The first thing I'm going to do is watch TV and close the door."