Kelsey Smith’s parents hopeful cell phone law is closer to being passed

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OVERLAND PARK, Kan. -- Eight-years after a killer kidnapped and murdered Kelsey Smith, her family is still fighting for a bill that could help police find missing people much faster.

Smith's family said the bill may have received the break it needs after senator Pat Roberts introduced the Kelsey Smith act as an amendment to the justice for victims of trafficking act of 2015.

The Kelsey Smith act would allow law enforcement to lawfully and quickly access cell phones by pinging them.  Kelsey’s parents have been fighting to get the act passed since 2010.

The Kelsey Smith act is currently a law in 17 states, but the amendment would make it a law nationwide. The law recently helped find a missing baby just a few weeks ago in Kansas.

"That she's really working hard to get it done," Missey Smith, Kelsey's mother said. "I really think it's her. Just because of the way she was...if you didn't know where she stood with her she would tell you and that's kind if the way I am. Like you need to understand why this laws important and let's get it done."

Security footage caught video of Kelsey being forced into a truck, and days later her body was found 20 miles away.

Kelsey’s body was found because investigators pinged her cell phone.

The Smiths said when the act is passed they will create a new movement not only in honor of Kelsey but for missing children all over the country.​

"It might kind of be like the day of sentencing," Missey said. "When I felt like I could no longer do anything for her, like I was complete. There will be something else I'm sure but for that to be finished, it'll be bittersweet."