Young adults speak out about raising the minimum wage in KC

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Kansas City’s youth are speaking out about raising the minimum wage.

Supporters of a city hike, that critics say is illegal, took their cause to the streets Wednesday by holding a “raise the wage” canvas around the metro.

"Everybody should have the opportunity to live comfortably," said Karina Rodriguez, one of many young adults involved in the Social Change Institute, organized by the American Friends Service Committee.

"We are looking for a change, and there's hope, because it's coming from younger people. It's not just coming from adults," said Nosa Eke, another group member.

He says the group consists of high school aged youth. It's a Quaker based peace and social justice organization devoted to reducing or ending the root causes of violence and injustice in the world.

"It gives us hope, that we can see that they'll be generations in the future and more and more people that will not just be sitting back and allowing the most powerful people to make all the decisions, but they'll play their role in the democracy and stand up and fight and work for justice and peace," said the program coordinator, Ira Harritt.

Harritt says they learn about political power, what people make decisions and how to get in touch with the right politicians about certain issues.

Wednesday they took to the streets to discuss raising the minimum wage with members of the community.

"We want them to have an experience where they're actually applying what they're learning," said Harritt.

"MIT has a wage calculator for each city, and for Kansas City, right now, the living wage for a single parent and a child would be $21 an hour," Eke said.

"Even though we may not be working right now, or some people are too young to work, we still care about this," Rodriguez said.

There will be a “raise the wage” rally on June 22 at 5 p.m. at City Hall. It is open to the public.