Lenexa HOA blames Google Fiber subcontractor for major road damage

LENEXA, Kan. -- People in a neighborhood in western Lenexa blame the installation of Google Fiber for destroying their streets.

The Whispering Hills community has used its entire $60,000 budget set aside for road repair, but leaders of the Homeowners Association say the problems will cost a lot more to fix.

Fixing the roads in the Whispering Hills neighborhood has become a huge financial burden for homeowners who live in the private neighborhood.

“First we thought it was a water main break. It was that impressive of a thing. The water department came out because they said there might be something here,” said David Junk, who has lived in the neighborhood for 32 years.

Junk is also a civil engineer who collaborated with the Homeowners Association to figure out what went wrong. The HOA thinks the culprit is the Google Fiber lines installed the past spring causing conduits for water to flow more freely and pool at the bottom of hills.

“As soon as you have that, your create a sponge. Now you have vehicles driving over that sponge repeatedly and that water gets squished out and moved around. The road bed that the road is supposed to lay on and be supported by is now soft and deteriorated,” said Don Nedved a resident and HOA board member. He has a construction background and worked closely with the HOA to investigate the problem.

They already identified three areas where roads have to be replaced. Those two projects depleted the annual $60,000 budget for road maintenance. Now there’s no money left to fix another $25,000 problem.

“You just see moisture coming up from the pavement. It looks like a damp spot. But then each day it grew a little bit more and actually started puffing up,” Junk said of the growing issue in front of his home.

The HOA president said they’re running out of options to cover costs. Residents already pay $950 in fees, up nearly $200 from last year. He said they’re looking to take legal action.

FOX 4 reached out to the subcontractor that did the work, Ervin Cable Company. They declined to comment, but did say most of the damage was already there. The company also said if it damaged the roads in some way, they’ll be back to fix it.