Charlotte police release dashcam and body camera footage in deadly shooting of Keith Scott

**Warning: Viewer discretion advised for both videos in this story, as both contain graphic elements**

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Dashboard camera footage provided by authorities in the police-shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott shows a police vehicle approach the scene where a plainclothes officer already has a weapon drawn on Scott. Moments later a uniformed officer joins the first officer's position behind a truck. Someone shouts "drop the gun" several times before Scott exits his car. While walking backwards, Scott is shot several times by police officers.

The release comes one day after a video recorded by Keith Scott's widow was released publicly. Charlotte Police Chief Kerr Putney said the cell phone recording didn't factor into his decision to release dashcam and body-camera video of the fatal shooting.

"Our practice and our protocol is to release as soon as we can, to inform," Putney said, adding that he waited until the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation assured him it would not adversely impact its investigation.

Tuesday's shooting of Scott, a black man, by a black police officer at an apartment complex parking lot has led to protests -- which turned violent at times -- in Charlotte over the past four nights. It is among a number of shootings in recent years that have spurred debate about how and when police should use deadly force and how race factors into whom police shoot.

Neither dashboard nor body camera footage shows Scott pointing a gun at police officers. Police say Scott was carrying a gun at the time of the deadly standoff. The Scott family contends he was carrying a book and had no gun.

Charlotte police on Saturday released a photo of a pistol it says Keith Scott had on him when he was shot. The department also included photos of an ankle holster and what it said was a marijuana cigarette.

"You can't clearly identify what, if anything, is in his hand," attorney Justin Bamberg, who represents the Scott family, said at press conference on Saturday evening.

Earlier, Chief Putney said, before the videos were released, that "there is no definitive visual evidence that he had a gun in his hand."

The status of the videos held by police -- body-camera and dashcam footage -- has been a point of contention between police and Scott's family, with authorities declining to release them throughout the week.

Demonstrators on Saturday gathered for a fifth day in the city's center. A diverse crowd of hundreds of people marched from Marshall Park after a short rally. The crowd stopped at the Charlotte-Mecklenburg police headquarters and chanted: "No tapes; no peace."

In another released video, a camera worn by a uniformed Charlotte police officer shows him running up to the encounter between other officers and Scott. The officer with the camera moves next to a white truck and pauses next to a plainclothes officer before running around to his left. As the officer passes a gap between vehicles Scott is visible, with his right arm by his side. The next time Scott is seen, he is lying on the ground with five officers converging on him. There is no audio for the first 25 seconds of the video and none of the shots is heard. CNN is asking police whether the tapes have been selectively edited, either in audio or video.

'Don't shoot him'

Scott's widow released her cell phone recording of the shooting -- the first to be released publicly -- on Friday.

"Don't shoot him. He has no weapon," Rakeyia Scott can be heard saying in the footage. The first portions of the shaky video appear to show a number of police officers surround a vehicle in a parking lot.

A man repeatedly yells for someone -- apparently Keith Scott -- to "drop the gun."

"He doesn't have a gun. He has a TBI (traumatic brain injury)," Rakeyia Scott says. "He's not going to do anything to you guys. He just took his medicine."

She goes on to say: "Keith, don't let them break the windows; come on out the car. Keith! Don't do it. Keith, get out the car. Keith! Keith, don't you do it. Don't you do it. Keith! Keith! Keith!"

The video shakes, and for a moment, a man in bright blue pants is seen near the surrounded vehicle. Gunshots are heard as Rakeyia Scott says again, "Don't you do it."

She then yells: "Did you shoot him? Did you shoot him? He better not be (expletive) dead." Two people kneel over the figure with blue pants, apparently Keith Scott, now lying on the ground.

Police said an officer shot Scott after he failed to heed commands to drop a gun. His family has said he didn't have a gun.

The gun police say they recovered from the scene was loaded, a source close to the investigation told CNN. The source said investigators recovered from the weapon fingerprints, blood and DNA that matched with Scott. The source said the blood most likely got on the gun after the shooting.


The shooting

Central to the protests are the differing accounts between police and Scott's family over what led to his death. Authorities said a black police officer fatally shot Scott, a father of seven, at the apartment complex as officers looked for another man named in a warrant they were trying to serve there.

Police said Scott had a gun as he exited his vehicle, and that Officer Brentley Vinson shot him after Scott did not comply with officers' commands to drop the weapon.

Scott's family has said he was reading a book and waiting for his son to come home from school at the time. Police said no book was found at the scene.