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Cherokee Nation donates $10K to Standing Rock Sioux’s fight against pipeline

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Members of the Colorado River Tribes hold a banner to show their support for Native Americans of the Standing Rock reservation who oppose the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), at the protest camp near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on September 3, 2016. The Indian reservation in North Dakota is the site of the largest gathering of Native Americans in more than 100 years. Indigenous people from across the US are living in camps on the Standing Rock reservation as they protest the construction of the new oil pipeline which they fear will destroy their water supply. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — The Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma has donated $10,000 to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota to support its fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Cherokees say they presented a check last week in addition to providing three truckloads of firewood for those camping out to protest construction of the pipeline.

The Standing Rock Sioux want construction to stop on the $3.8 billion pipeline, saying it could contaminate the water supply and encroach on tribal burial sites. Protests supporting the tribe have been going on for months and have drawn thousands of people to the area where Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners is trying to finish building the 1,200-mile pipeline.

More than 220 people have been arrested since demonstrations began in August, including 80 protesters on Saturday.