Shane Ray talks facing off against his hometown team in Sunday’s Chiefs-Broncos game

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DENVER, Colo. -- The Chiefs head out to Denver to take on the Broncos on Sunday.

Denver linebacker and KC-native Shane Ray will face his hometown team. The Bishop-Miege grad and Mizzou alum has 32 tackles and 4 sacks so far.

Ray won a Super Bowl with the Broncos as a rookie and after a brief offseason break back in KC, he returned to Denver with a huge Kansas City-themed tattoo across his back.

Some might wonder how Ray's Denver teammates feel about him walking through the locker room with a Chiefs logo on his back.

Ray said he's representing his home, but come game day, he's all Bronco.

"I'm glad that I have because they can see that I'm from there, but I'm going to be bringing the pain back, you know what I'm saying?" Ray said. "It's all good."

Ray said his love is for the city, and he even brought some of his Denver teammates to take in a bit of KC culture.

"Von [Miller] came with me when we came to Kansas City and so I took Von to my barber shop. So my barber shop in Kansas City is like any other barber shop, it's like the central where everybody goes, you know , and so everybody in there is Chief'd out. I mean, you walk in you got Derrick Thomas posters; you got Chiefs this, Chiefs that, Chiefs flags, and me and Von walk in. Everybody's like, 'Aw, you didn't.' Yeah, we here. And so we in there talking stuff, and told them, 'we got mind control over the Chiefs,'" Ray laughed. "Just talking stuff and having fun. The people there, they love me, you know. That was the whole thing: just the love that I get from my city; the respect that I get from everybody there; and coming back and showing them my ring, knowing where I came from and my roots, everybody there is just so happy for me and from what I've been able to do coming from Kansas City, even though I got to beat them twice a year."