Metro crash victim’s father says ‘Move Over Bill’ lacks enforcement

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Missouri lawmakers are considering changes to the “Move Over” Law. The provision would add utility workers to the list of people drivers have to give space to safely work on the side of the road. This week proposed changes to include them passed the Missouri House and moved to the Senate.

“Every day we work on busy and narrow roads, delivering the energy that fuels our community. We support the safety of all utility workers. And, we support adding utility workers to the Move Over Law in Missouri — because ensuring the safety of hardworking men and women everywhere should always be a top priority for our state,” a Missouri Gas Energy representative said.

“The safety of our employees and customers is our first priority at KCP&L. We support legislation that creates a safer work environment for our employees. We will continue to follow this bill as it moves through the legislative process,” a KCP&L spokesperson said.

But GT Tow Service owner, James Gresham, wonders how much safer the bill will really make workers? His 18-year-old son Blake was a tow truck driver too. He was killed in 2012 while helping a stranded motorist on I-35.

At the time, Kansas City police weren’t even sure whether tow truck drivers were included in Missouri’s "Move Over" law. It turns out that they are, but Gresham says his son’s death has done little to change police or driver behavior.

He says he’s worked thousands of highways scenes since, and nearly every time someone goes flying by unaware. He says he's never seen law enforcement he was working with ticket anyone.

Since he doesn't believe drivers have to worry about what violating the law will cost them, instead he asks driver’s to consider what it will cost the families of who you might hit.

"Just everybody needs to slow down, put the cell phones down,” Gresham said.