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2 new measles cases reported in Kansas City, health officials say

In this photo illustration, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine are displayed on a counter at a Walgreens Pharmacy on January 26, 2015 in Mill Valley, California. (Photo by Illustration Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Two new measles cases in Kansas City, Missouri, have been reported, health officials say.

A Kansas City Health Department spokesperson confirmed the two new cases, bringing the city’s total to four cases.

The department said it will release more details about the two new cases, including new exposure locations, on Thursday.

A Liberty School District spokesperson said one of the new Kansas City cases stems from a student at a Liberty elementary school who lives in KC.

Parents in the district received a letter Wednesday saying, “At this time, we believe that there was no measles exposure to parents, students, staff or guests at Warren Hills Elementary during school hours.”

On the other side of the state line, there have been 16 confirmed cases of the measles. Officials have identified 13 Johnson County confirmed cases, along with 2 Linn County residents and 1 Miami County resident. Many of the Kansas cases link back to an outbreak at a Johnson County day care facility.

Health officials on both sides of the state line have urged “people who are ill or exhibiting measles-like symptoms to stay at home unless they are seeking medical care. Before visiting a healthcare provider, call ahead so that the provider can take measures to protect other patients and staff.”

Symptoms of measles typically begin with a high fever, cough, runny nose and red watery eyes. Three to five days after symptoms begin, a rash develops and usually starts on the face at the hairline and spreads down to the neck, trunk, arms and legs.

The average number of days between when a person is exposed to measles and when they first start showing symptoms is approximately 10 to 14 days, health officials say.

Those who have had the MMR vaccine have an extremely low chance of contracting the virus.