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Meryl Lin McKean joined FOX 4 in 1985 and currently is the station's health and medical reporter.

She produces and anchors "FOX 4 Health," a nightly segment focusing on health-related issues.

Meryl Lin came to FOX 4 from KTUL-TV in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where she was the health reporter and weekend news co-anchor for four years.

Prior to her position in Tulsa, Meryl Lin worked at WOC-TV in Davenport, Iowa.

Meryl Lin graduated magna cum laude from the University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, with a bachelor's degree in broadcasting and film.

Meryl Lin received the 2010 Mid-America Emmy for Health/Science News. She also won an Emmy in 1997, and was a nominee in 2000, 2005, 2006 and 2011. She has received numerous public education awards including the Russell L. Cecil Award for journalism from the Arthritis Foundation, and second place in the American Academy of Family Physicians' television journalism awards. The Kansas City Mayor's Committee on Persons with Disabilities presented her with its 1996 Media Award and she received the 1997 Community Service Award from the Alliance for the Mentally Ill. In 1997, the Kansas City Press Club honored Meryl Lin with a first place Heart of America Award for general reporting, and she received a first place Heart of America Award for feature reporting in 2000, and for franchise reporting in 2007. The American Society of Anesthesiologists honored Meryl Lin with its 2000 Media Award. She is the 2002 recipient of the Television Media Award from the Missouri Public Health Association.

Meryl Lin is a member of the Association of Health Care Journalists. She is listed in the twenty-fourth edition of Who's Who in the Midwest and is active in Delta Zeta Sorority. Meryl Lin is a member of the board of directors of the Jim Eisenreich Foundation for Children with Tourette's Syndrome.

Off-camera, Meryl Lin is an avid sports fan and enjoys playing piano. Meryl Lin is a native of Warrensburg, Missouri, and currently resides in Leawood, Kansas.


Recent Articles
  • More standing, less sitting may benefit your blood

    KANSAS CITY, Mo — Do you feel like you’re chained to your desk and chair at work? You can get up. New research shows what happens in your blood when you do. Jim Gately is really a stand-up guy. Since May, the electrical designer has purposely stood four to six hours a day at his desk. “I feel more energized when I go home,” said Gately. He could be getting other benefits in his blood. Australian researchers found an extra […]

  • New balloon device may aid weight loss

    KANSAS CITY, MO — The Food and Drug Administration approved a new weight loss tool this week. It’s a device with two balloons that’s placed in the stomach. The procedure begins the patient being sedated. The device, called ReShape, goes down the throat and into the stomach. It has two silicone balloons with a flexible shaft. The balloons are inflated with saline to take up room in the stomach and help the patient feel full. After six months, the device […]

  • Two heart transplants on same night result in lasting friendship

    KANSAS CITY, Mo — Two lives were saved at a Kansas City hospital five years ago Thursday, and one great friendship was born. One guy dishes it out. “I’m glad to see you dressed up,” said Kelly Jobe of Wichita. The other guy takes it and then dishes a little, too. “What are you laying in bed for?” asked Scott Garst of Topeka. It’s how a friendship can form. “Oh, wow, there’s somebody more obnoxious than I am,” recalled Jobe […]

  • Dietitian recommends sweet alternatives to table sugar

    OVERLAND PARK, Kan. — Nutrition experts say there’s nothing sweet about how much sugar Americans down in foods and drinks. It’s about 20 teaspoons a day. A sugary diet is linked to obesity and heart disease even if you aren’t obese. When you think of alternatives to table sugar, artificial sweeteners or substitutes probably come to mind. They have no calories, but no nutritional value either. Courtney Kruse, a registered dietitian with Hy-Vee in Overland Park, says spice is nice […]

  • Seventh-grader Ryan Williams waits for nurse to place bandage after receiving vaccine.

    Many opportunities in metro for kids to get back-to-school shots

    KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Health departments in the metro are offering many regular clinics and special events (see list below) for kids to get back-to-school shots.  Without those vaccinations, they risk not being allowed in school. Before Ryan Williams enters seventh grade in the Kansas City, Kansas School District, he must have a TDAP booster shot. “So you don’t get sick and get out of school.  You have to stay in school,” Ryan said. Wyandotte County health officials say school districts are […]

  • Experts concerned about high rate of ultrasound exams during pregnancy

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The average woman who delivered a baby last year had five ultrasound exams during pregnancy. That’s according to an analysis done for the Wall Street Journal. It’s nearly double the average of a decade ago, and experts are concerned that many of the exams are being done unnecessarily. Elizabeth Oswald is expecting her first child at age 38. She’s had bleeding on and off during pregnancy. “You don’t know if your baby’s dead or alive inside […]

  • Help your child be successful

    The way to be sure that your kindergartner will be a successful adult

    OVERLAND PARK, Kan. — Share. Play fair. Say you’re sorry. Those of just some of the things you may have learned in kindergarten or before. New research shows your child’s social and emotional skills in kindergarten are a strong predictor of success in early adulthood. In three short weeks, Kira Wajcman will be a kindergartner. “I’m really excited for her to go and explore and be in social situations,” said her mother, Sara Wajcman. Penn State researchers followed 800 children. […]

  • Study: good social skills early tends to lead to success as an adult

    OVERLAND PARK, Kan. — Share. Play fair. Say you’re sorry. Those of just some of the things you may have learned in kindergarten or before.  Now new research shows your child’s social and emotional skills in kindergarten are a strong predictor of success in early adulthood. In three short weeks, Kira Wajcman will be a kindergartner. “I’m really excited for her to go and explore and be in social situations,” said her mother, Sara Wajcman. Penn State researchers followed 800 […]

  • High cost of cancer drugs

    Doctors urge action on cancer drug costs

    WESTWOOD, Kan. — More than one hundred of the nation’s top cancer doctors are calling for action to reduce the cost of cancer drugs for patients. They’re encouraging patients to demand action, too. Pat Koenig’s granddaughter and daughter know she’s a miracle—the Lenexa, Kansas, woman has lived with a chronic blood cancer for nearly 60 years. “I’ve outlived a lot of the doctors that I’ve seen,” said Koenig. But a year ago, Koenig didn’t think she’d live much longer. She […]

  • Metro teens ask Congress to support research, coverage for type one diabetes

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Two metro teens did more than see the sights in Washington, D.C. last week.  They talked to lawmakers about type one diabetes, the type typically diagnosed in kids or young adults.  The pancreas produces little or no insulin. Insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitors help Amelia Cooper of Kansas City and Sierra Adams of Leawood live with type one diabetes. “I remember before I had this, my mom had to check my blood sugar like every […]

  • Neighbor saving neighbor shows value of bystander CPR

    OLATHE, Kan. — Can you do CPR? A new study from Duke University finds bystander CPR boosts survival by a third compared to waiting on first responders. It also reduces the chances of brain damage in survivors. You don’t have to convince two Shawnee men of the benefit. Back on St. Patrick’s Day, Glenn Miller had more than luck on his side when he started feeling “uncomfortable.” Miller couldn’t reach his wife by phone, so he called his neighbor, Gary […]

  • Blacks more than twice as likely as whites to suffer sudden cardiac arrest

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A new study finds blacks are more than twice as likely as whites to suffer sudden cardiac arrest, a condition in which the heart suddenly stops beating. Phyllis Whiteside’s heart has stopped beating three different times. “Horrifying. At the time, it wasn’t, but the aftermath ’cause when it happens, you really don’t know that it’s happening,” Whiteside said. She was fortunate. Her life was saved by an implanted defibrillator, a device she got after being diagnosed […]