Thieves reportedly using stolen credit cards on Apple Pay

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA - OCTOBER 20:  A worker demonstrates Apple Pay inside a mobile kiosk sponsored by Visa and Wells Fargo to demonstrate the new Apple Pay mobile payment system on October 20, 2014 in San Francisco City. Apple's Apple Pay mobile payment system launched today at select banks and retail outlets.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

SAN FRANCISCO, CA – OCTOBER 20: A worker demonstrates Apple Pay inside a mobile kiosk sponsored by Visa and Wells Fargo to demonstrate the new Apple Pay mobile payment system on October 20, 2014 in San Francisco City. Apple’s Apple Pay mobile payment system launched today at select banks and retail outlets. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Thieves are using stolen credit card data to make bogus purchases on Apple Pay, Apple’s mobile payment system.

The stolen card data is believed to have come from recent hacks on major retailers including Home Depot and Target, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

Here’s what’s happening: Apple’s system hasn’t been hacked. But cyber thieves are taking stolen credit card data, entering it into smartphones, and making purchases — all without the use of an actual credit card or signature.

About 80% of these unauthorized purchases have actually been bought with smartphones at Apple stores, the Journal reports, citing sources familiar with the matter.

This isn’t good news for Apple Pay, which launched last fall, highlighting just how much damage cyber thieves can create.

Apple Pay’s network includes major merchants such as Whole Foods, McDonald’s, Bloomingdale’s and Walgreens.