WORLD CUP RECAP: Sweden stops Switzerland; England beats Colombia in a shootout

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia — Shy, diminutive and without that distinctive ponytail, Emil Forsberg couldn’t be more different than the larger-than-life Zlatan Ibrahimovic.

They share an ability to conjure something out of nothing on a soccer field, though, as Forsberg showed in leading Sweden into the World Cup quarterfinals for the first time in 24 years.

Sweden’s midfielder Albin Ekdal celebrates their victory at the end of the Russia 2018 World Cup round of 16 football match between Sweden and Switzerland at the Saint Petersburg Stadium in Saint Petersburg on July 3, 2018. (PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images)

Forsberg dropped his shoulder to create space at the edge of the area and scored with a deflected shot to earn the Swedes a 1-0 victory over Switzerland on Tuesday.

“It brings tears to my eyes,” Forsberg said, “and makes me so proud.”

The 26-year-old Forsberg arrived in Russia shouldering much of Sweden’s creative burden following the international retirement of Ibrahimovic, who ruled the national team for more than a decade and is the greatest player the country ever produced.

Forsberg was quiet in the group stage but the attacking midfielder’s skills and slick movement stood out against Switzerland in an otherwise scrappy game between two of Europe’s less-decorated nations.

“He has developed in terms of the holistic approach to his game,” Sweden coach Janne Andersson said. “Even if he doesn’t succeed in every dribble, in every part of his game he contributes in so many ways and he has those decisive moments.”

Forsberg didn’t get much power behind his shot and it was likely heading straight for Switzerland goalkeeper Yann Sommer. However, it took a deflection off the foot of center back Manuel Akanji and bounced up and into the net.

Sweden became the fifth European team to reach the quarterfinals and will next play either England or Colombia on Saturday in Samara. Limited but with a highly effective game plan, the Swedes should not be underestimated.

This was another opportunity spurned by the Swiss, who have reached the last 16 in four of their last five appearances at the World Cup only to be eliminated without scoring a goal. They haven’t scored in a knockout game in soccer’s biggest tournament in 64 years, when they last reached in the quarterfinals at home in 1954.

They finished the game with 10 men after right back Michael Lang was sent off in stoppage time for a professional foul on Sweden substitute Martin Olsson. The referee initially awarded a penalty kick but later gave a free kick on the edge of the area after a video review.

Switzerland was fortunate to still be in the match at that point.

Ibrahimovic, now 36 and playing out his illustrious career in the United States, would surely have put away some of the first-half chances created by his countrymen against a fragile Switzerland defense which was missing the suspended Fabian Schaer and Stephan Lichtsteiner.

Switzerland’s defender Manuel Akanji looks dejected at the end of the Russia 2018 World Cup round of 16 football match between Sweden and Switzerland at the Saint Petersburg Stadium in Saint Petersburg on July 3, 2018. (JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Striker Marcus Berg was the biggest culprit, spurning two openings in quick succession, while Albin Ekdal volleyed over with the goal at his mercy.

The Swedes were limited but played to the strengths that got them past Italy in the two-leg World Cup playoff and to the top of a group containing defending champion Germany, Mexico and South Korea. Their long balls forward caused panic and they were more bullish in their tackling in midfield.

The Swiss certainly weren’t playing like a team ranked No. 6 in the world and with only one loss in their previous 25 games. Their build-up play was sloppy, with the best effort falling to Remo Freuler with a late header that was saved by Robin Olsen.

“They have done precisely what they’re very good at,” Switzerland coach Vladimir Petkovic said, “and that might have been enough to beat us.

“When they score a goal, it is always extremely difficult to crack that tough nut.”

The last time Sweden made it this far at the World Cup was in 1994, when the team reached the semifinals.

SUSPENDED

Sweden right back Mikael Lustig will miss the quarterfinals after collecting his second yellow card of the tournament for a tug on Switzerland striker Josip Drmic in the first half.

The team will have Sebastian Larsson back from a ban, however, and the holding midfielder should go straight back into the starting lineup.

BIG BLUNDERS

A low-quality match featured some of the worst finishing seen so far at the World Cup, and two efforts stood out.

In the first half, Lustig dragged a long-range attempt sideways and it went out for a throw-in. Then, in the second half, Switzerland midfielder Granit Xhaka lined up a shot from outside the area and very nearly whiffed.

BABY WATCH

Sweden captain Andreas Granqvist chose to play even though his wife, Sofie, was due to give birth to the couple’s second child on Tuesday.

In a post on her Instagram page, she said she “told her to stay in the stomach until at least tomorrow!”

Switzerland forward Breel Embolo, who returned home last week to attend the birth of his first child, came on as a second-half substitute.

MOSCOW — In a World Cup of surprises, England provided the latest by finally winning a penalty shootout.

A long run of penalty misery on soccer’s biggest stage ended with a 4-3 shootout victory over Colombia on Tuesday, sending England to the quarterfinals for the first time in 12 years.

Harry Kane of England celebrates after scoring his team’s first goal during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia Round of 16 match between Colombia and England at Spartak Stadium on July 3, 2018 in Moscow, Russia. (Dan Mullan/Getty Images)

Eric Dier scored the decisive kick after a scrappy game ended in a 1-1 draw, denying Colombia a second consecutive trip to the quarterfinals.

“It was a nervous one,” Dier said. “I’ve never really been in a situation like that before.”

England will next play Sweden in the quarterfinals on Saturday in Samara. It is the furthest England has progressed in any tournament since the David Beckham era, when a golden generation of players exited the 2002 and 2006 World Cups in the last eight.

England is advancing in Russia after defending champion Germany was eliminated early and Argentina, Portugal and Spain went home in the round of 16.

Harry Kane gave England the lead with a penalty kick in the 57th minute. But as the game entered the third minute of stoppage time, Yerry Mina headed in an equalizer.

“To get knocked down at the end like we did at the end, it’s difficult to come back from that,” Dier said. “But we were ready for that. We were calm. We stuck to our plan.”

England trailed 3-2 in the penalty shootout after Jordan Henderson’s shot was saved, but Mateus Uribe hit the bar and goalkeeper Jordan Pickford then saved Carlos Bacca’s kick.

“I did a whole bunch of research,” Pickford said. “Falcao is the only one who didn’t go his way. I don’t care if I’m not the biggest keeper in the world. I have the power and agility.”

Colombia’s midfielder Mateus Uribe reacts after missing to score a penalty kick next to England’s goalkeeper Jordan Pickford celebrating during the penalty shoot-out of the Russia 2018 World Cup round of 16 football match between Colombia and England at the Spartak Stadium in Moscow on July 3, 2018. (FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images)

Pickford succeeded where Peter Shilton, David Seaman and Paul Robinson failed as the 1990, 1998 and 2006 World Cup campaigns ended in shootout losses. On top of that, England was knocked out of the 1996 European Championship semifinals and the quarterfinals in 2004 and 2012 on penalties. The country’s only shootout success came earlier at Euro ’96.

With a fresh generation of players not burdened by past misery, England coach Gareth Southgate has helped to banish painful memories of his own: Missing the final kick at Euro ’96 against Germany.

After exiting the 2014 World Cup without winning a game in the group stage, the squad has been remodeled with a youthful, more street-wise mentality by Southgate at his first major tournament as coach.