Latino community upset over President Trump’s plan to end birthright citizenship

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- President Trump's plans to end the automatic right to citizenship for children born in the United States to non-citizen parents is drawing some strong reactions from the Latino community.

Trump said he would do away with automatic citizenship for children of immigrants with an executive order. Legal experts claim such a move would be unconstitutional.

The tougher talk on immigration a week before the election has some concerned and others calling it a scare tactic.

According to the Pew Research Center about 275,000 babies were born to parents who were not American citizens in 2014.
UMKC student Aly Hernandez was not born in the United States.

She obtained permanent residency status because her father is a citizen. But she believes not allowing birthright citizenship will make the illegal immigration problem much worse.

"It's kind of outrageous and its just attacking the children who have not say in where they were born and who deserve the services that sometimes families don’t have the opportunity to give them," said Hernandez, a member of the Association of Latin American Students. "So they can attend college. Had their birthright citizenship not been granted to them they probably would not be in college. They would have very diminished opportunities."

An immigration attorney tells FOX 4 many undocumented workers have lived in the metro area for more than 20 years. They have not obtained legal status because federal laws would not allow it. She says to revoke citizenship from their children who were born here would create a new sub class of people.

Trump called it "ridiculous" to grant citizenship based on birth, but other nations, including Canada and some Latin American countries allow some form of birthright citizenship.