Home appraisals increasing means higher property taxes in Johnson County

OLATHE, Kan. – It might be sticker shock for some, as Johnson County home appraisals have been calculated and are hitting mail boxes this week.

Appraisals are again increasing this year, which means taxes will too.

The Johnson County Appraiser bases its home value by what homes in your neighborhood have sold for over the past 12 to 18 months.

There is a mechanism in pace to appeal that amount, but the bottom line is, Johnson County is the hot place to live and you are going to pay for it.

"Last year we had eight different areas that were over double digits. This year we only have one," Johnson County Appraiser Paul Welcome said.

Neighborhoods like Westwood, Westwood Hills, Fairway and parts of Prairie Village will see the largest property value gains of over 10 percent.

"Folks also want to live in the nicer older neighborhoods,” Realtor Tom Suther said. “They can't make any more of those really, so those prices continue to go up."

Sellers eager to unload their homes for big profits, but not for those staying put.

"Well, it means higher tax bills,” Suther said. “It is one thing to know your house is increasing in value but unless you are selling your house you are not going to realize that.”

Fifty percent of Johnson County property tax goes to the school districts. The city, county and state split up the rest. The amount you pay is determined by what the county says your house is worth.

Requests for appeals to the county appraiser’s office increased 34 percent from 2017 to 2018.

About half the appeals were accepted and values adjusted.

"If you still have a green shag carpet it probably needs to be replaced at this time. I don't think that is back in style yet,” Welcome said.

Besides dated decor, flood damage, foundation issues and other structural problems may qualify for a reduction.

There is a form on the back of your property appraisal to fill out if you want to appeal the value.

Any sort of documentation, pictures and other proof that your house is not worth what the county says it is will go a long way in winning your appeal.

You can also access the information here

 

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