Cass County residents contending with floodwaters from Tuesday’s rainy deluge

PLEASANT HILL, Mo. -- All of Tuesday's rainfall has to go somewhere.

People living in Cass County spent the day dealing with rising water, most of which came from overflowing creeks and rivers. As of Tuesday night, it threatened only streets and highways.

However, anxious residents across the county were worried about where the flooding could lead.

Traffic barricades are a common sight as two stretches of State Route 58 were closed to cars, including a well-traveled area near downtown Pleasant Hill.

Just outside the TayaBella Salon on First Street, a stack of sandbags, which sit outside the shop's front door are the business owner's ounce of prevention.

"There's water. The road's closed," said Brandie Johnson, salon owner.

Johnson said she's owned the business for seven years, and she's accustomed to seeing floodwater creep past the sidewalk toward the salon's front door.

One section of State Route 58, which is semi-submerged, sits about a thousand yards from her shop.

"It's gotten about two feet outside the door. We just try to prevent it from coming inside," Johnson said. "I would say we're definitely used to it, but it's definitely a hassle. If it comes in here, we have to close down for a day or two because we'll have to bleach everything and dry everything out."

The scene is similar in western Cass County near Freeman. State Route 2 took on water that usually remains in a roadside creek near the BP Pipelines facility.

The Freeman Community Club RV Park looked more like a pond, whereas it usually has several occupants. As of Tuesday at lunchtime, water was building around the only RV left parked there.

Down Annette Lake Road along the South Grand River, parts of the road are impassible. Rushing water, which has jutted from the nearby river, has claimed parts of the blacktop road.

Elizabeth Burnett's driveway had about two feet of water in it. She said she and her family don't like this part of living in a rural paradise.

"I'd imagine, if not before too long, if we get any more rain this evening, that's going to be a real big issue after dark," Burnett said. "I get used to it. I just watch what I'm doing and today, I left work a little early to make sure I can get in my driveway."

When flood waters flow, the natural question for homeowners in Cass County is when to evacuate.

Johnson said if her shop is dry, she'll be in business. Burnett agreed that she'll remain until water hits her porch and beyond.

In the small Cass County town of Archie, classes were canceled at public schools. That town of roughly 1,000 sits along Highway A near the South Grand River. Most of that district's students live in rural regions where school buses can't go when it floods.

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