KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An eventful night last night with tons of lightning, torrential rain, and a few areas of small hail, but overall what was going pretty good from a severe weather standpoint west of Kansas City sort of just rumbled through the metro with fanfare, but nothing too crazy.

This has been a strange severe weather season in a sense, and now it appears it may be shutting down for awhile. Our next front, a strong one, comes into the area on Friday, but may move too far away from here before it can fire up with storms, and that front will usher in some pretty chilly air for May.

We’ll be going from hot weather tomorrow to sweater weather on Saturday. Hey it could be worse… the odds are increasing on an accumulating snow in Colorado.

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Kansas City Forecast:

Today: Mixed clouds and sunshine. Warm with highs into the lower 80s.

Tonight: Fair skies and pleasant with lows in the lower 60s.

Tomorrow: Hotter and windier too, highs well into the 80s.

Friday: We’ll likely have an early morning high as a front works through. Temperatures may be in the 80s on the south side at lunch and in the 70s on the north side. Rain is expected to develop at night

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Discussion:

Last night’s storms did produce some wind gusts and a few knocked over tree limbs, but overall the main issue was the torrential rain and the vivid lightning. We sort of got ourselves into a jumbled mess of convection in the early evening and my thoughts are that sort of threw the atmosphere into more of a chaotic mess. In time, a wave developed from the activity coming across central Kansas and that’s what got us in the metro.

The Ws represent the wind reports. Ts are tornado reports and Hs are hail reports

The hail wasn’t that much of an issue and sort of petered out coming eastwards to small stuff really.

The rain was impressive for many areas though, especially out west where it really came down.

Vis COCORaHS

As the complex of storms moved across the State Line though it weakened considerably and the heavier rains fell apart.

Northern Missouri also had some nasty weather, that was more in the evening with some wind damage towards Hopkins, up along the Iowa border.

via Nodaway County Sheriffs Office

You can see how an innocuous area of thunderstorms in northern Kansas came together and on the western end a larger storm became the dominant one.

The whole thing eventually turned into this fascinating wave. See how it turned into an exaggerated comma?

This formation is called a book-end vorticy and is characteristic of a Mesoscale Convective System. They actually have happened many times in the past, but this one was a vivid one as it came closer to Kansas City.

As they mature, which this one did west of the area, they can create lots of wind. But since this matured west of the region, it was in a weakening phase as it was coming closer to the State Line area. Hence we had the heavy rains and the lightning, but overall not much severe weather at all.

Just sort of a strange season so far I think.

The next significant change is a strong for May cold front that will be dumping chilly for May air into the Plains later on Friday. With the flow aloft and above this front coming from the west-southwest, and cooler air flowing in Friday night especially, that is a recipe for rain to develop into the cooler air. That is a recipe for a chilly Saturday, especially if we can’t get a lot of sunshine happening until later in the day.

We may have 1 a.m. highs on Saturday morning, then on Saturday afternoon… wowza. Here is the EURO idea for PM highs.

And the GFS idea:

And there will be wind to add to that.

Not a great combination.

Lows Sunday AM will dip into the 40s, and I’ll be watching for record potential. The record is 41 degrees in 1963. Doubt we get there.

So another big change coming for the weekend. Sunday by the way looks really nice at this point. Odds favor a return of some heat later on next week though, and we’ll get more rain too, perhaps next Monday after the next rain later Friday night into Saturday.

Our feature photo comes from Taylor Abbott.

Joe