Black Archives planning new exhibit to honor 60 people killed by lynching in Missouri

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. — At the Black Archives of Mid-America, a set of new names and stories are being added to an already impressive list of of black names inside the walls.

As part of new exhibit called “The Story’s In The Soil,” 60 people killed by lynching in Missouri will have their stories brought back to life.

Each victim will have their name placed on a jar, filled with soil from the site of their death.

“We cannot let their names remain anonymous. They were victims of lynchings,” said Dr. Carmaletta Williams, executive director of the Black Archives of Mid-America Kansas City.

Williams wants to build an interactive exhibit that will feature a hologram, displays and features that will place visitors at the scene of one the darkest moments in history.

“We can pretend that it didn’t happen, but then people couldn’t heal,” Williams said.

The effort also comes as the House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would make lynching a federal crime.

With a 410-4 vote, the Emmitt Till Anti-Lynching Bill now move to the Senate.

The Senate unanimously approved an anti-lynching bill of their own.

Back in 1955, the 14-year-old Till was hanged, and his body dumped in the water for reportedly whistling at a white woman. His mother chose to have an open casket funeral to show the world the impact of hate.

Williams said with the bill, America can no longer hide from the past.

 “I think that what this law says is that we recognize what happened to you was a horrendous act, and that we see you as human beings who deserve better and deserve justice,” she said.

If you are interested in donating to the exhibit, click here and hit the donate button. Indicate that your donations are intended specially for the new exhibit.

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