KANSAS CITY, Mo. — A woman admitted she was high and texting while driving when she hit and killed a bicyclist and father of 10 last month, according to court documents.

Jackson County Prosecutors charged 27-year-old Kyrie Fields, of Wisconsin, with leaving the scene of an accident and tampering with a motor vehicle.

The charges are connected to the death of Charles Criniere. He was on a bicycle ride near Longview Lake on Aug. 27, 2022. Prosecutors said Fields hit Criniere and drove away. According to the probable cause statement, police found vehicle pieces scattered near Criniere’s body.

Investigators determined the car parts were from a white Acura MDX, and tracked the parts to identify Fields as the driver in the deadly hit-and-run crash.

The day after the crash, Grandview police were called to a collision center along U.S. 71 Highway. When they arrived, officers found a white Acura MDX that someone set on fire.

According to the probable cause statement, police determined the car was towed to the body shop from a Lee’s Summit home after the alleged owner of the car said she hit a deer.

Detectives questioned a person who lived at the Lee’s Summit home and was later identified as Fields’ boyfriend. The man told police the Acura MDX belonged to his mother, but Fields was driving it.

He also told officers Fields parked the car in the garage on Aug. 27, after telling him she hit a deer. That evening, the man said Fields ordered a tow truck using a fake name, and had the car towed to Grandview.

Officers arrested Fields on Sept. 12. The probable cause statement shows Fields admitted to driving the vehicle at the time of the crash. She said she was texting a friend, then she took her eyes of the roadway and when she looked up she struck the victim on his bicycle. 

Fields also admitted she was high on Percocet at the time of the deadly hit-and-run, and also took Percocet after the crash, according to court documents.

Prosecutors requested a $100,000 bond in the case.

Meanwhile, friends of Criniere told FOX4 they’re grieving but trying not to be angry or bitter. Instead they’re trying to show grace.

“We want to guard our hearts from getting into that place of being bitter and having unforgiveness because that’s like poison. It just spreads,” said Ken DeBenedictis, a friend from church.

“I think there needs to be something beautiful come out of the ashes here,” said Justin Jeffries, another friend. “That would be that we’re surrounding this person and their family and friends with love and forgiveness and hope that their lives will be changed through all of this.”

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