JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – President Joe Biden approved Governor Mike Parson’s request Monday for a federal disaster declaration in Missouri following the July 25-28 flash flooding event in the St. Louis region.

Parson declared a state of emergency in Missouri on July 26. The governor sent the disaster declaration request to President Biden on Thursday, Aug. 4, after meeting with the Missouri State Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, and local emergency managers.

According to the governor’s office, the flash flooding damaged more than 750 homes and 130 businesses and led to at least $35 million in damage to uninsured infrastructure and emergency response costs.

The disaster declaration means eligible residents in St. Louis City, as well as St. Louis and St. Charles counties, can seek federal assistance from FEMA for temporary housing, housing repairs, replacement of damaged belongings, vehicles, and other qualifying expenses relating to the flooding and storms.

FEMA’s Public Assistance program is also available to the City of St. Louis and St. Louis, Montgomery, and St. Charles counties. This program allows local governments and qualifying nonprofits to seek federal aid for reimbursement of emergency response and recovery costs, including repair and replacement of damaged infrastructure.

The deadline for most individual assistance programs is 60 days following President Biden’s disaster declaration.

People in the aforementioned areas who sustained damage or losses due to the flooding between July 25 and July 28 can apply for federal disaster assistance online at www.DisasterAssistance.gov or by calling FEMA’s toll-free application line 1-800-621-FEMA from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Central Time, seven days a week. Residents are encouraged to document their losses with photographs and receipts.

Individuals with unmet needs and those who would like to help should contact United Way 211. Visit http://211helps.org or call 2-1-1 for assistance. Recovery.mo.gov also has additional resources and information about disaster recovery in Missouri.