KANSAS CITY, Mo. — With the legalization of marijuana in Missouri, thousands of Kansas City-area voters will now decide if their city can tax sales of the drug.

Leaders in multiple cities are planning a 3% local tax on recreational marijuana, but first voters will weigh in.

Three percent is the highest city sales tax allowed under Missouri’s Amendment 3, which legalized recreational marijuana use for those 21 and older.

Separately, the state will also charge a 6% sales tax on all recreational marijuana purchases.

The local tax will not apply to medical marijuana purchases, and the state will keep its 4% tax rate for anyone with a medical marijuana card.

But in order for any city to collect a new tax, voters have to approve it.

These jurisdictions have already approved putting a 3% recreational marijuana sales tax on the April 4 ballot:

Kansas City

The Kansas City Council approved plans to implement a 3% local sales tax on recreational marijuana. Now it will be up to voters.

Over five years, Kansas City expects $300 million worth of marijuana to be sold within its borders, and leaders estimate the local tax could eventually add up to $10 million a year in revenue for Kansas City.

“This 3% allows us to invest in neighborhood quality of life — in trash pick-up, in homelessness prevention and, importantly, violence prevention — three things that we underfund regularly,” Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas previously told FOX4.

The local marijuana sales tax will now appear as a ballot question in the April 4 municipal election for Kansas City voters.

Raytown

Raytown was the first city in the Kansas City area to take a major step toward taxing recreational marijuana locally.

In early January, city leaders approved ballot language, asking voters to approve a 3% marijuana tax. It will read:

“Shall the city of Raytown impose an additional sales tax of three percent (3%) on the retail sale of adult use non-medicinal marijuana? Notes: The tax collected under this provision would not apply to medical marijuana.”

If voters approve the tax, Raytown estimates the city could see about $60,000 of annual revenue. There’s currently only one dispensary within city limits: From The Earth on Highway 350.

If approved, that tax revenue would go to the general fund, much like taxes on alcohol and tobacco.

Liberty

Liberty voters will also get to decide if there should be an additional tax on recreational marijuana sales in the city.

Members of the city council approved putting the issue on the April 4 ballot. If approved, there would be an additional 3% local tax on recreational marijuana sales.

Money raised from the municipal tax would be used to pay for different public safety issues, according to city council members.

According to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, there is only one licensed dispensary in Liberty’s city limits.

Blue Springs

The Blue Springs City Council will put a 3% tax on recreational marijuana sales on the April ballot.

The council unanimously approved the plan at a Jan. 17 meeting. The sales tax proposal will now go before Blue Springs voters on April 4.

The proposed ballot question would read: “Shall the City of Blue Springs impose an additional sales tax of three percent (3%) on the retail sale of adult use non-medicinal marijuana?”

The ordinance for the marijuana tax does not designate what the tax revenue would go toward.

Independence

Independence leaders are asking voters to approve a 3% marijuana tax this spring.

The city council voted Jan. 17 to put the local tax on the April 4 ballot.

The city estimates the tax could bring in anywhere from $270,000 to $615,000 in revenue. City leaders said the funds could be dedicated to public safety or neighborhood services, but that’s not official yet.

Lee’s Summit

The Lee’s Summit City Council unanimously voted at its Jan. 17 meeting to put a 3% marijuana tax on the April ballot.

The ballot language will read: “Shall the city of Lee’s Summit, Missouri, impose a city sales tax of three percent (3%) on all retail sales of adult use marijuana sold in the city of Lee’s Summit, Missouri?”

Lee’s Summit currently only has two dispensaries within city limits.

At their Jan. 10 meeting, city leaders didn’t have an estimate on how much tax revenue the city would see and have not designated what the funds would go toward.

Grandview

The Grandview City Council is also asking voters to approve an additional 3% city sales tax on recreational marijuana.

The Grandview Board of Alderman approved the local marijuana tax, and it will now appear on the April 4 ballot.

A city spokesperson said the tax revenue would go to the general fund.

Belton

Belton city leaders also recently approved plans to impose a 3% local marijuana sales tax. The issue will now head to the April 4 ballot for voters to weigh in.

The ballot question will read: “Shall the City of Belton, Missouri, impose a sales tax of three percent on all tangible personal property retail sales of adult use, non-medical marijuana sold in the City of Belton, Missouri?”

If approved, council members have previously said the tax revenue could then toward funding for issues like public safety.

Raymore

Raymore leaders have approved plans to put a 3% local marijuana tax on the April tax.

If approved, the funds from the sales tax will be allocated to Raymore’s general fund.

Peculiar

Peculiar city leaders unanimously passed a 3% local marijuana tax, but it will first head to the voters in April.

Revenue from the local tax would go to the city’s general fund, according to the city.

Jackson County

Jackson County voters will get to decide in April if the county can tax recreational marijuana sales at 3%.

The legislature’s decision comes after county leaders worked out a plan Tuesday about how they’d like to spend that revenue.

The ballot question will tell voters that, if approved, the county would create a special revenue fund for community services and veteran support services, but it will also be part of Jackson County’s general revenue, which legislators control.

Riverside

After unanimous council approval, the city of Riverside will ask voters to approve a 3% sales tax on recreational marijuana.

The question on the April ballot will read: “Shall the City of Riverside, Missouri impose a sales tax of three percent (3%) on the retail sale of adult use non-medical marijuana?”

Kearney

Kearney’s Board of Aldermen unanimously approved plans to put a 3% local marijuana tax before voters on the April ballot.

The ballot question will read: “Shall the City of Kearney, Missouri impose a city sales tax of Three Percent (3%) on the sales of adult use marijuana sold at retail?”



These cities discussed a local tax on marijuana but will likely not have the item on the April ballot:

North Kansas City

Plans to put a marijuana sales tax up for vote in North Kansas City have stalled out.

The 3% sales tax proposal did not move forward at a Jan. 17 meeting due to a lack of motion from council members.

The city only has a few days left to approve something for the April 4 ballot, but council members did mention the idea could be considered again for another election.